thinking2_190430-800x450-2

You and OCD: What Would You Do?

WOW, all of us at OCD North are so excited about the poll responses from last week! Not only because so many people participated, but because so many people know how to conquer OCD! WOOHOO. OCD does not stand a chance when it comes to the OCD North community!

Below you will find the poll results and the best approach for each, what would you do question.

Question 1

OCD tells you your biggest fear is going to happen, do you?

-80% of people selected “buckle in and get ready to accept the fear.”

-20% of people selected “argue back and try to prove it wrong.”

Best answer – “Buckle in and get ready to accept the fear.”

We want to lean into the fear OCD is telling us will happen. Arguing back to prove OCD wrong leaves us exhausted and allows OCD to find more ways to worry us. So, let’s leave out the arguing and lean into that fear.

Questions 2

OCD is telling you that you cannot pick up a certain item. Because if you do, something bad will happen, do we?

-89% of people selected “pick up the item.”

-11% of people selected “listen to OCD and avoid picking up the item.”

Best answer – “Pick up the item.”

That’s right let’s pick up the item. Even better, let OCD tell you the likelihood something bad will happen, then pick up the item and see how wrong OCD was. Or take the chance to live in the uncertainty that you may never know if OCD was wrong.

Questions 3

OCD gives you an urge to go back and check that the stove is off, do you?

-66% of people selected “continue your day with the uncertainty that the stove is off.”

-34% of people selected “go back and check one more time to be certain the stove is off. “

Best answer – “Continue your day with the uncertainty that the stove is off.”

If you chose to go back and check the stove because of OCD, you are now feeding OCD by completing a checking compulsion. When you continue your day living in the uncertainty of the stove being on and do not engage in a compulsion, you allow the distress to come down naturally and learn how to tolerate the distress and uncertainty.

Question 4

OCD has you convinced you did something terrible, do you?

-20% of people selected “find someone nearby and ask them if it really did happen.”

-80% of people selected “bravely acknowledge that maybe you did.”

Best answer – “Bravely acknowledge that maybe you did.”

When you try to seek reassurance, OCD will continue to want more from you, never satisfied with an answer. Therefore, if you bravely acknowledge the fear that you did something terrible and allow the distress to come down naturally, you take power back from OCD.

Question 5

OCD gives you an urge to go back and check that the door is locked, do you?

-67% of people selected “continue your day with the uncertainty that the door is locked.”

-33% of people selected “go back and check one more time to be certain the door is locked.”

Best answer – “Continue your day with the uncertainty that the door is locked.”

Similar to the stove situation, if we chose to go back and check the door because of OCD, we are now feeding OCD by completing a checking compulsion. When you continue your day living in the uncertainty that the door may be unlocked, you allow the distress to come down naturally and learn how to tolerate the distress and uncertainty.